Acetohydroxamic acid

Name: Acetohydroxamic acid

Acetohydroxamic acid dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Urinary Tract Infection:

Starting dose: 12 mg/kg/day administered at 6 to 8 hour intervals at a time when the stomach is empty.

Then progress to one tablet orally 3 to 4 times a day in a total daily dose of 10 to 15 mg/kg/day.

The maximum daily dose should be no more than 1.5 grams, regardless of body weight.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Urinary Tract Infection:

Children with chronic, recalcitrant, urea-splitting urinary infection may benefit from treatment with acetohydroxamic acid. However, detailed studies involving dosage and dose intervals in children have not been established.

Children have tolerated a dose of 10 mg/kg/day, taken in two or three divided doses, satisfactorily for periods up to one year. Therefore, an initial dose of 10 mg/kg/day orally is recommended.

Close monitoring of the patient's clinical condition and hematologic status is recommended. Titration of the dose to higher or lower levels may be required to obtain an optimum therapeutic effect and/or to reduce the risk of side effects.

What other drugs will affect acetohydroxamic acid?

Other drugs may interact with acetohydroxamic acid, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Chest pain or pressure.
  • Swelling, warmth, numbness, change of color, or pain in a leg or arm.
  • A heartbeat that does not feel normal.
  • Dark urine or yellow skin or eyes.
  • Feeling very tired or weak.
  • Very upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Low mood (depression).

If OVERDOSE is suspected

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Dosing & Uses

Dosage Forms & Strengths

tablet

  • 250mg

Chronic Urinary Tract Infection

Indicated for chronic UTS caused by urea-splitting organisms

Initial: 12 mg/kg/day PO divided q6 -8hr on empty stomach 

Maintenance: 250 mg PO q6-8hr; not to exceed 1.5 g/day

Renal Impairment

SCr 1.8-2.5 mg/dL [159-221 micromoles/L]: Dose q12hr; not to exceed 1 g/day

SCr >2.5 mg/dL [>221 micromoles/L]: Not recommended

Dosage Forms & Strengths

tablet

  • 250mg

Chronic Urinary Tract Infection

Indicated for chronic UTS caused by urea-splitting organisms

Initial: 10 mg/kg/day PO divided q6-8hr on empty stomach; titrate to patient response 

Chronic Urinary Tract Infection

Indicated for chronic UTS caused by urea-splitting organisms

Initial: 12 mg/kg/day PO divided q6-8hr on empty stomach

Maintenance: 250 mg PO q6-8hr; not to exceed 1.5 g/day

Acetohydroxamic Acid Dosage

Take acetohydroxamic acid exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully.

The Acetohydroxamic Acid dose your doctor recommends will be based on the following (use any or all that apply):

  • the condition being treated
  • other medical conditions you have
  • other medications you are taking
  • how you respond to this medication
  • your weight
  • your height
  • your age
  • your gender

Acetohydroxamic Acid is available in the following doses:

  • Acetohydroxamic Acid 250 Mg Oral Tablet

For the Consumer

Applies to acetohydroxamic acid: oral tablet

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Headache.
  • Feeling nervous and excitable.
  • Anxiety.
  • Feeling tired or weak.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Not hungry.
  • Shakiness.
  • Hair loss.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Because acetohydroxamic acid is eliminated primarily by the kidneys, patients with significantly impaired renal function should be closely monitored, and a reduction of daily dose may be needed to avoid excessive drug accumulation.

Patients whose serum creatinine is greater than 1.8 mg/dL should take no more than 1 gm/day These patients should be dosed at 12 hour intervals. Further reductions in dosage to prevent the accumulation of toxic concentrations in the blood may also be desirable. Insufficient data exists to accurately specify the optimum dose and/or dose interval in patients with moderate degrees of renal insufficiency.

Patients with advanced renal insufficiency (i.e., serum creatinine more than 2.5 mg/dL) should not be treated with acetohydroxamic acid. The risk of accumulation of toxic blood levels of acetohydroxamic acid seems to be greater than the chances for a beneficial effect in such patients.

Dialysis

Data specific to use in dialysis patients is not available.

Patients with advanced renal insufficiency (i.e., serum creatinine more than 2.5 mg/dL) should not be treated with acetohydroxamic acid. The risk of accumulation of toxic blood levels of acetohydroxamic acid seems to be greater than the chances for a beneficial effect in such patients.

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