Aciphex (Rabeprazole Sprinkle Capsules)

Name: Aciphex (Rabeprazole Sprinkle Capsules)

Uses of Aciphex

  • It is used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; acid reflux).
  • It is used to treat heartburn.
  • It is used to treat or prevent GI (gastrointestinal) ulcers caused by infection.
  • It is used to treat or prevent ulcers of the swallowing tube (esophagus).
  • It is used to treat syndromes caused by lots of stomach acid.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Aciphex?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Call your doctor if you have throat pain, chest pain, very bad belly pain, trouble swallowing, or signs of a bleeding ulcer like black, tarry, or bloody stools, throwing up blood, or throw up that looks like coffee grounds. These may be signs of a worse health problem.
  • This medicine may affect how much of some other drugs are in your body. If you are taking other drugs, talk with your doctor. You may need to have your blood work checked more closely while taking Aciphex with your other drugs.
  • Do not take this medicine for longer than you were told by your doctor.
  • This medicine may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take Aciphex.
  • This medicine may raise the chance of hip, spine, and wrist fractures in people with weak bones (osteoporosis). The chance may be higher if you take this medicine in high doses or for longer than a year, or if you are older than 50 years old. Talk with your doctor.
  • Use care if you have risks for soft, brittle bones (osteoporosis). Some of these risks include drinking alcohol, smoking, taking steroids, taking drugs to treat seizures, or having family members with osteoporosis. Talk with your doctor about your risks of osteoporosis.
  • Low magnesium levels have rarely happened in people taking drugs like this one for at least 3 months. Most of the time, this has happened after 1 year of care. You will need to have your blood work checked if you will be taking Aciphex for a long time or if you take certain other drugs like digoxin or water pills. Talk with your doctor.
  • Long-term treatment (for instance longer than 3 years) with drugs like this one has rarely caused low vitamin B-12 levels. Talk with the doctor.
  • Lupus has happened with this medicine, as well as lupus that has gotten worse in people who already have it. Tell your doctor if you have lupus. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of lupus like a rash on the cheeks or other body parts, sunburn easy, muscle or joint pain, chest pain or shortness of breath, or swelling in the arms or legs.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using Aciphex while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

How is this medicine (Aciphex) best taken?

Use this medicine as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Keep taking Aciphex as you have been told by your doctor or other health care provider, even if you feel well.
  • Take 30 minutes before a meal.
  • Do not swallow it whole.
  • Open capsule and sprinkle contents on soft food (applesauce, fruit or veggie baby food, or yogurt). You may also empty contents into a little bit of liquid (infant formula, apple juice, children's electrolyte drink). The food or liquid must be at or lower than room temperature. Take within 15 minutes of mixing. Do not store the mixture for later use. Do not chew or crush granules.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

What are some other side effects of Aciphex?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Headache.
  • Belly pain.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Loose stools (diarrhea).
  • Hard stools (constipation).
  • Gas.
  • Sore throat.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

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