Acuvail

Name: Acuvail

What side effects can this medication cause?

Ketorolac eye drops may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • stinging and burning of the eyes
  • blurry vision

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop using ketorolac eye drops and call your doctor immediately:

  • redness or swelling of eyes, lips, tongue, or skin
  • infection in or around the eye
  • skin rash, hives, or skin changes
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

From

Eye Health Resources
  • How's Your Eye Health?
  • Diabetes and Your Eyes
  • Eye Care for Diabetes
Featured Centers
  • 13 Best Quit-Smoking Tips Ever
  • What Stress Does to Your Mouth
  • Healthy Home: To Buy or Not to Buy Organic?
Health Solutions From Our Sponsors
  • Frequent Constipation?
  • Greater Food Accessibility
Reviewed on 9/29/2015 References REFERENCE: Ketorolac FDA Prescribing Information.

Warnings

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

Overdose

No information provided.

Uses For Acuvail

Ketorolac eye drops is used to treat itching caused by seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (an allergy that occurs at only certain times of the year). It is also used to treat pain, burning, and inflammation of the eye following cataract surgery or corneal refractive surgery. This medicine is a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Contraindications

Acuvail® solution is contraindicated in patients with previously demonstrated hypersensitivity to any of the ingredients in the formulation.

Adverse Effects

>10%

Transient ocular burning/stinging

1-10%

Conjunctival hyperemia

Corneal edema

Iritis

Corneal infiltrates

Iritis

Corneal edema

Ocular inflammation

Ocular irritation

Ocular pain

Increased ocular pressure

Superficial keratitis

Superficial ocular infection

<1%

Blurred vision

Corneal ulcer

Corneal erosion

Corneal thinning

Perforation of cornea

Dry eyes

Epithelial breakdown

Corneal epithelial degeneration

Postmarketing reports

Bronchospasm, exacerbation of asthma, and epithelial breakdown

Side effects

Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to the rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Clinical Studies Experience

The most common adverse reactions were reported in 1-6% of patients and included increased intraocular pressure, conjunctival hyperemia and/or hemorrhage, corneal edema, ocular pain, headache, tearing and vision blurred. Some of these reactions may be the consequence of the cataract surgical procedure.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during postmarketing use of ketorolac tromethamine ophthalmic solutions in clinical practice. Because they are reported voluntarily from a population of unknown size, estimates of frequency cannot be made. The reactions, which have been chosen for inclusion due to either their seriousness, frequency of reporting, possible causal connection to topical ketorolac tromethamine ophthalmic solutions or a combination of these factors, include bronchospasm, exacerbation of asthma, corneal erosion, corneal perforation, corneal thinning and corneal melt, epithelial breakdown [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] and ulcerative keratitis.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Acuvail (Ketorolac Tromethamine Ophthalmic Solution)

Read More »

Important information

You should not use Acuvail if you are allergic to ketorolac or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).

Before using Acuvail, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any medications, or if you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder, diabetes, arthritis, glaucoma, dry eye syndrome, or if you have had other recent eye surgeries.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Use Acuvail exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Using the medication for longer than prescribed may increase the risk of serious side effects on your eyes.

While you are using Acuvail, do not wear any contact lens that has not been approved by your doctor. Do not use any other eye medications unless your doctor has prescribed them.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to ketorolac ophthalmic: ophthalmic solution

General

The most frequently reported side effects were transient stinging and burning on instillation.[Ref]

Ocular

Common (1% to 10%): Intraocular pressure increased, conjunctival hyperemia, conjunctival hemorrhage, corneal edema, ocular pain, tearing, vision blurred, corneal infiltrates, ocular edema, iritis, ocular inflammation, ocular irritation, superficial keratitis, superficial ocular infection, conjunctivitis, ocular pruritus, keratic precipitates, retinal hemorrhage, cystoid macular edema, eye trauma, ptosis, blepharitis, photophobia, corneal lesion, glaucoma
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Ulcerative keratitis, eye dryness, epiphora, corneal ulcer
Postmarketing reports: Corneal erosion, corneal perforation, corneal thinning, corneal melt, epithelial breakdown[Ref]

Local

Very common (10% or more): Transient stinging (up to 40%), burning (up to 40%)
Common (1% to 10%): Local allergic reaction[Ref]

Nervous system

Common (1% to 10%): Headache[Ref]

Respiratory

Postmarketing reports: Bronchospasm, asthma exacerbated[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Common (1% to 10%): Hypersensitivity reaction[Ref]

Some side effects of Acuvail may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

(web3)