Adacel

Name: Adacel

Descriptions

Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis booster vaccine (also known as Tdap) is a combination immunizing agent given by injection to protect against infections caused by diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), and pertussis (whooping cough). This vaccine is given to children 10 years of age and older, and to adults who have already been given this vaccine in the past. The vaccine will "boost" or increase the protection that the child or adult had from an earlier dose.

Diphtheria is a serious illness that can cause breathing difficulties, heart problems, nerve damage, pneumonia, and possibly death. The risk of serious complications and death is greater in very young children and in the elderly.

Tetanus (also known as lockjaw) is a serious illness that causes convulsions (seizures) and severe muscle spasms that can be strong enough to cause bone fractures of the spine. Tetanus causes death in 30 to 40 percent of cases.

Pertussis (also known as whooping cough) is a serious disease that causes severe spells of coughing that can interfere with breathing. Pertussis also can cause pneumonia, long-lasting bronchitis, seizures, brain damage, and death.

Children 10 years of age and older, and adults, may need an additional immunization called a booster against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. Adults and teenagers should receive Tdap instead of the tetanus-diphtheria (Td) injection if it has been 10 years or more since their last tetanus-diphtheria vaccine. Tdap vaccine is recommended for adults who are in close contact with a baby who is less than a year old and for adults who work in the healthcare field.

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are serious diseases that can cause life-threatening illnesses. Although some serious side effects can occur after a dose of Tdap (usually from the pertussis vaccine part), this rarely happens. The chance of your child catching one of these diseases, and being permanently injured or dying as a result, is much greater than the chance of your child getting a serious side effect from the Tdap vaccine.

This vaccine is to be given only by or under the direct supervision of your doctor.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Suspension

Warnings

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

Uses of Adacel

  • It is used to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Adacel?

  • If you have an allergy to any part of Adacel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have seizures or any other brain or nervous system problem.
  • If you have had a brain problem like coma, lowered level of awareness, or seizures from an unknown cause within 7 days of a previous vaccine that has pertussis.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this medicine.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Adacel with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Adacel?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • This medicine may not protect all people who use it. Talk with the doctor.
  • If you have a latex allergy, talk with your doctor.
  • Not all brands of vaccines are for children. Talk with your child's doctor.
  • Some children may need to have more than 1 dose of this vaccine. Talk with your child's doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using Adacel while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

What are some other side effects of Adacel?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Pain where the shot was given.
  • Redness or swelling where the shot is given.
  • Headache.
  • Feeling tired or weak.
  • Fever or chills.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Belly pain.
  • Loose stools (diarrhea).
  • Joint pain or swelling.
  • Swollen gland.

Young children:

  • Feeling fussy.
  • Not hungry.
  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Crying that is not normal.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Breastfeeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

What should i avoid before or after receiving this vaccine (adacel (tdap), boostrix (tdap))?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity after receiving a Tdap vaccine.

  • Vaccination and Immunization Safety Information
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