AdreView

Name: AdreView

Patient information

Instruct patients to inform their physician or healthcare provider if they:

  1. are pregnant or breast feeding.
  2. are sensitive to iodine, an iodine-containing contrast agent or other products that contain iodine.
  3. are sensitive to Potassium Iodide Oral Solution, or Lugol's Solution.
  4. have reduced renal function.

Instruct patients to increase their level of hydration prior to receiving AdreView (iobenguane i 123 injection for intravenous use) and to void frequently for the first 48 hours following AdreView (iobenguane i 123 injection for intravenous use) administration.

What other drugs will affect iobenguane I-123?

Some medicines can interfere with the quality of images produced by iobenguane I-123. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you recently stopped using, especially:

  • an antidepressant such as amitriptyline, bupropion, citalopram, desipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, paroxetine, sertraline, Wellbutrin, Zoloft, Prozac, Celexa, and others;

  • blood pressure medication; or

  • cough, cold, or allergy medicine that contains a decongestant (phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine).

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with iobenguane I-123, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Before Using AdreView

In deciding to use a diagnostic test, any risks of the test must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. Also, other things may affect test results. For this test, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of iobenguane I 123 in children with neuroblastoma younger than 1 month of age, or in children of any age with congestive heart failure. Safety and efficacy have not been established in these populations.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of iobenguane I 123 in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving iobenguane I 123.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast Feeding

Studies in women breastfeeding have demonstrated harmful infant effects. An alternative to this medication should be prescribed or you should stop breastfeeding while using this medicine.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this diagnostic test, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Receiving this diagnostic test with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Albuterol
  • Amineptine
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amitriptylinoxide
  • Amoxapine
  • Bambuterol
  • Bupropion
  • Butriptyline
  • Carvedilol
  • Citalopram
  • Clomipramine
  • Cocaine
  • Desipramine
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dibenzepin
  • Dothiepin
  • Doxepin
  • Duloxetine
  • Ephedrine
  • Epinephrine
  • Escitalopram
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Furazolidone
  • Guanethidine
  • Imipramine
  • Iprindole
  • Iproniazid
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Isoproterenol
  • Labetalol
  • Linezolid
  • Lofepramine
  • Melitracen
  • Metaproterenol
  • Methylene Blue
  • Midodrine
  • Milnacipran
  • Moclobemide
  • Nefazodone
  • Norepinephrine
  • Nortriptyline
  • Opipramol
  • Pargyline
  • Paroxetine
  • Phenelzine
  • Phenylephrine
  • Phenylpropanolamine
  • Procarbazine
  • Propizepine
  • Protriptyline
  • Pseudoephedrine
  • Rasagiline
  • Reserpine
  • Selegiline
  • Sertraline
  • Terbutaline
  • Tianeptine
  • Tranylcypromine
  • Trimipramine
  • Venlafaxine

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this diagnostic test. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Allergy to iodine, an iodine-containing contrast agent (dye), or other products containing iodine (eg, potassium iodide or Lugol's solution), history of—May increase risk of an allergic reaction to occur again.
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure) or
  • Thyroid problems—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Kidney disease, severe—Use with caution. The effects of this medicine may be increased because of slower removal from the body.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this diagnostic test, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Receiving this diagnostic test with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Albuterol
  • Amineptine
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amitriptylinoxide
  • Amoxapine
  • Bambuterol
  • Bupropion
  • Butriptyline
  • Carvedilol
  • Citalopram
  • Clomipramine
  • Cocaine
  • Desipramine
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dibenzepin
  • Dothiepin
  • Doxepin
  • Duloxetine
  • Ephedrine
  • Epinephrine
  • Escitalopram
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Furazolidone
  • Guanethidine
  • Imipramine
  • Iprindole
  • Iproniazid
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Isoproterenol
  • Labetalol
  • Linezolid
  • Lofepramine
  • Melitracen
  • Metaproterenol
  • Methylene Blue
  • Midodrine
  • Milnacipran
  • Moclobemide
  • Nefazodone
  • Norepinephrine
  • Nortriptyline
  • Opipramol
  • Pargyline
  • Paroxetine
  • Phenelzine
  • Phenylephrine
  • Phenylpropanolamine
  • Procarbazine
  • Propizepine
  • Protriptyline
  • Pseudoephedrine
  • Rasagiline
  • Reserpine
  • Selegiline
  • Sertraline
  • Terbutaline
  • Tianeptine
  • Tranylcypromine
  • Trimipramine
  • Venlafaxine

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

What is AdreView?

AdreView (iobenguane I-123) belongs to a group of drugs called diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. Iobenguane I-123 is a radioactive agent that allows images of specific organs in the body to be detected by a gamma camera.

AdreView is used to detect certain kinds of tumors.

AdreView is also used in people with congestive heart failure to assess the function of nerves that control the heart muscle. Iobenguane I-123 can detect nerve damage to help identify a patient's risk of death from heart failure.

Important information

You should not receive AdreView if you are allergic to iobenguane. Tell your doctor if you have ever had any type of reaction to another contrast agent, or to potassium.

Before you are treated with AdreView, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, a thyroid disorder, if you are dehydrated or unable to urinate, or if you are allergic to iodine.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you are using, especially antidepressants, cold medicines, blood pressure medications, or ADHD medications. You may need to stop using certain drugs for a short time before you receive AdreView.

Drink extra fluids before you receive AdreView, and for at least 48 hours afterward. Follow your doctor's instructions about the types and amount of liquids you should drink before and after your test. Iobenguane I 123 is radioactive and it can cause dangerous effects on your bladder if it is not properly eliminated from your body through urination. Do not allow yourself to become dehydrated during the first few days after receiving AdreView. Call your doctor if you have any vomiting or diarrhea during this time. Follow your doctor's instructions about the types and amount of fluids you should drink.

How is AdreView given?

AdreView is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting. It is usually given about 24 hours before your radiologic test.

At least 1 hour before you are treated with AdreView, you may be given a liquid drink that contains medicine to protect your thyroid from harmful radioactive effects of iobenguane I-123.

Drink extra fluids before you receive AdreView, and for at least 48 hours afterward. Follow your doctor's instructions about the types and amount of liquids you should drink before and after your test. Iobenguane I-123 is radioactive and it can cause dangerous effects on your bladder if it is not properly eliminated from your body through urination.

Expect to urinate often during the first 48 hours after your test. You will know you are getting enough extra fluid if you are urinating more than usual during this time. Urinating often will help rid your body of the radioactive iodine.

What happens if I overdose?

Since this medication is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur.

AdreView side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reactionto AdreView: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Common AdreView side effects may include:

  • dizziness;

  • rash, itching;

  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling);

  • headache; or

  • bleeding around your IV needle.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Iobenguane I 123 Identification

Substance Name

Iobenguane I 123

CAS Registry Number

76924-93-1

Drug Class

Radiopharmaceuticals

Iodine Radioisotopes

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