Adriamycin

Name: Adriamycin

Adriamycin Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • Paclitaxel
  • progesterone (Provera, Depo-Provera)
  • Verapamil
  • cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune)
  • cytarabine (DepoCyt)
  • cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan)
  • phenobarbital
  • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • streptozocin (Zanosar)
  • saquinavir

This is not a complete list of Adriamycin drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Adriamycin and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Adriamycin can harm your unborn baby. Women who may become pregnant should use effective birth control (contraception). Talk to your doctor about the best way to prevent pregnancy while receiving Adriamycin.

Adriamycin FDA Warning

WARNINGS

  1. Severe local tissue necrosis will occur if there is extravasation during administration. Adriamycin must not be given by the intramuscular or subcutaneous route.
  2. Myocardial toxicity manifested in its most severe form by potentially fatal congestive heart failure (CHF) may occur either during therapy or months to years after termination of therapy. The probability of developing impaired myocardial function based on a combined index of signs, symptoms and decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is estimated to be 1 to 2% at a total cumulative dose of 300 mg/m2 of Adriamycin, 3 to 5% at a dose of 400 mg/m2, 5 to 8% at 450 mg/m2 and 6 to 20% at 500 mg/m2. The risk of developing CHF increases rapidly with increasing total cumulative doses of Adriamycin in excess of 400 mg/m2. Risk factors (active or dormant cardiovascular disease, prior or concomitant radiotherapy to the mediastinal/pericardial area, previous therapy with other anthracyclines or anthracenediones, concomitant use of other cardiotoxic drugs) may increase the risk of cardiac toxicity. Cardiac toxicity with Adriamycin may occur at lower cumulative doses whether or not cardiac risk factors are present. Pediatric patients are at increased risk for developing delayed cardiotoxicity.
  3. Secondary acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have been reported in patients treated with anthracyclines, including Adriamycin. The occurrence of refractory secondary AML or MDS is more common when anthracyclines are given in combination with DNA-damaging anti-neoplastic agents or radiotherapy, when patients have been heavily pretreated with cytotoxic drugs, or when doses of anthracyclines have been escalated. The rate of developing secondary AML or MDS has been estimated in an analysis of 8563 patients with early breast cancer treated in 6 studies conducted by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP), including NSABP B-15. Patients in these studies received standard doses of Adriamycin and standard or escalated doses of cyclophosphamide (AC) adjuvant chemotherapy and were followed for 61,810 patient years. Among 4483 such patients who received conventional doses of AC, 11 cases of AML or MDS were identified, for an incidence of 0.32 cases per 1000 patient years (95% CI, 0.16 to 0.57) and a cumulative incidence at 5 years of 0.21% (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.41%). In another analysis of 1474 patients with breast cancer who received adjuvant treatment with Adriamycin-containing regimens in clinical trials conducted at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center,the incidence was estimated at 1.5% at 10 years. In both experiences, patients who received regimens with higher cyclophosphamide dosages, who received radiotherapy, or who were aged 50 or older had an increased risk of secondary AML or MDS. Pediatric patients are also at risk of developing secondary AML.
  4. Dosage should be reduced in patients with impaired hepatic function.
  5. Severe myelosuppression may occur.
  6. Adriamycin should be administered only under the supervision of a physician who is experienced in the use of cancer chemotherapeutic agent.

What is Adriamycin (doxorubicin)?

Doxorubicin is a cancer medication that interferes with the growth and spread of cancer cells in the body.

Doxorubicin is used to treat different types of cancers that affect the breast, bladder, ovary, thyroid, stomach, lungs, bones, nerve tissues, muscles, joints, and soft tissues. Doxorubicin is also used to treat Hodgkin's disease and certain types of leukemia.

Doxorubicin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

How is Adriamycin (doxorubicin)given?

Doxorubicin is injected into a vein through an IV. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Doxorubicin is sometimes given together with other cancer medications. You may be given other medications to prevent nausea, vomiting, or infections.

Tell your caregivers if you feel any burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle when doxorubicin is injected.

If any of this medication accidentally gets on your skin, wash it thoroughly with soap and warm water.

Doxorubicin can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections and help your blood to clot. Your blood will need to be tested often. Your cancer treatments may be delayed based on the results of these tests.

Uses For Adriamycin

Doxorubicin injection is used together with other medicines to treat cancer of the blood, lymph system, bladder, breast, stomach, lungs, ovaries, thyroid, nerves, kidneys, bones, and soft tissues, including muscles and tendons. It may also be used to treat other kinds of cancer, as determined by your doctor.

Doxorubicin belongs to the group of medicines known as antineoplastics. It seems to interfere with the growth of cancer cells, which are then eventually destroyed by the body. Since the growth of normal body cells may also be affected by doxorubicin, other effects will also occur. Some of these may be serious and must be reported to your doctor. Other effects, like hair loss, may not be serious but may cause concern. Some effects may not occur until months or years after the medicine is used.

Before you begin treatment with doxorubicin, you and your doctor should talk about the benefits this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it.

This medicine is to be given only by or under the direct supervision of your doctor.

Precautions While Using Adriamycin

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control to keep you or your partner from getting pregnant during therapy and for 6 months after the last dose of this medicine. If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away.

This medicine may cause irreversible heart muscle damage, leading to heart failure. This is more likely to occur if you have other heart problems, have had or currently receiving radiation therapy to your chest, or have received other cancer medicines. Tell your doctor right away if you have chest pain, decreased urine output, irregular heartbeat, trouble breathing, rapid weight gain, or swelling of your hands, ankles, or feet.

This medicine may increase risk of new cancers, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about this risk.

If doxorubicin accidentally seeps out of the vein into which it is injected, it may damage some tissues and cause scarring. Tell the doctor or nurse right away if you notice redness, pain, or swelling at the place of injection.

While you are being treated with doxorubicin, and after you stop treatment with it, do not have any immunizations (vaccinations) without your doctor's approval. Doxorubicin may lower your body's resistance, and there is a chance you might get the infection the immunization is meant to prevent. In addition, other persons living in your household should not take oral polio vaccine, since there is a chance they could pass the polio virus on to you. Also, avoid persons who have taken oral polio vaccine within the last several months. Do not get close to them, and do not stay in the same room with them for very long. If you cannot take these precautions, you should consider wearing a protective face mask that covers the nose and mouth.

Doxorubicin can temporarily lower the number of white blood cells in your blood, increasing the chance of getting an infection. It can also lower the number of platelets, which are necessary for proper blood clotting. If this occurs, there are certain precautions you can take, especially when your blood count is low, to reduce the risk of infection or bleeding:

  • If you can, avoid people with infections. Check with your doctor immediately if you think you are getting an infection or if you get a fever or chills, cough or hoarseness, lower back or side pain, or painful or difficult urination.
  • Check with your doctor immediately if you notice any unusual bleeding or bruising, black, tarry stools, blood in the urine or stools, or pinpoint red spots on your skin.
  • Be careful when using a regular toothbrush, dental floss, or toothpick. Your medical doctor, dentist, or nurse may recommend other ways to clean your teeth and gums. Check with your medical doctor before having any dental work done.
  • Do not touch your eyes or the inside of your nose unless you have just washed your hands and have not touched anything else in the meantime.
  • Be careful not to cut yourself when you are using sharp objects such as a safety razor or fingernail or toenail cutters.
  • Avoid contact sports or other situations where bruising or injury could occur.

This medicine may cause a serious type of reaction called tumor lysis syndrome. Your doctor may give you a medicine to help prevent this. Call your doctor right away if you have a decrease or change in urine amount, joint pain, stiffness, or swelling, lower back, side, or stomach pain, a rapid weight gain, swelling of the feet or lower legs, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

This medicine may decrease the amount of sperm made and affect a man's ability to father a child. It may also cause premature menopause in women. Talk with your doctor before you use this medicine if you plan to have children.

Doxorubicin causes your urine to turn reddish in color, which may stain clothes. This is not blood. It is to be expected and only lasts for 1 or 2 days after each dose is given.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal (eg, St. John's wort) or vitamin supplements.

References

1. “Hazardous Drugs”. OSHA. http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/hazardousdrugs/index.html

Administrative Information

LactMed Record Number

99

Last Revision Date

20170411

Disclaimer

Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

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