Advil Allergy Sinus

Name: Advil Allergy Sinus

Advil Allergy Sinus Overview

Advil Allergy Sinus is an over the counter medication used to treat the symptoms of colds, sinus congestion, and the flu. It is a single product containing 3 medications: ibuprofen, pseudoephedrine, and chlorpheniramine. Ibuprofen belongs to a group of drugs called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which work by providing pain/headache relief. Pseudoephedrine belongs to a group of drugs called nasal decongestants, which work by narrowing the blood vessels and reducing the swelling inside your nasal passage. Chlorpheniramine belongs to a group of drugs called Histamine H1 Antagonists (antihistamine). It works by blocking the action of histamine and allergy symptoms. 

This medication comes in a caplet form and is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours with food.

Common side effects of Advil Allergy Sinus include stomach upset, fast heart rate and shakiness. Advil Allergy Sinus can also cause drowsiness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how this medication affects you. 

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine?

Ibuprofen can increase your risk of fatal heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term or take high doses, or if you have heart disease. Even people without heart disease or risk factors could have a stroke or heart attack while taking this medicine.

Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Ibuprofen may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using this medicine, especially in older adults.

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, or pseudoephedrine, or if you have ever had an asthma attack or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin or an NSAID.

Do not use this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke;

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;

  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;

  • a breathing problem, such as asthma, emphysema, or bronchitis;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • a thyroid disorder;

  • glaucoma;

  • diabetes;

  • enlarged prostate or problems with urination; or

  • fluid retention.

This medicine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children.

You should not use antihistamine medication to make a child sleepy.

This medicine may be harmful to an unborn baby. Taking ibuprofen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may result in birth defects and prolonged labor and delivery. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant.

Chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are breast-feeding.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine?

This medicine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Avoid taking aspirin or other NSAIDs while you are taking chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, and pseudoephedrine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any cold, allergy, or pain medicine. Many medicines available over the counter contain chlorpheniramine, ibuprofen, or pseudoephedrine. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much of these types of medication. Check the label to see if a medicine contains an antihistamine, decongestant, or pain reliever.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Weakness on 1 side of the body, trouble speaking or thinking, change in balance, drooping on one side of the face, or blurred eyesight.
  • Chest pain or pressure.
  • Shortness of breath, a big weight gain, or swelling in the arms or legs.
  • Very bad dizziness or passing out.
  • Any unexplained bruising or bleeding.
  • Very bad belly pain.
  • Black, tarry, or bloody stools.
  • Throwing up blood or throw up that looks like coffee grounds.

Other information

  • read all warnings and directions before use. Keep carton.
  • store at 20-25°C (68-77°F)
  • avoid excessive heat above 40°C (104°F)

What other drugs will affect Advil Allergy Sinus?

Before taking Advil Allergy Sinus, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as other cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by chlorpheniramine.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

  • steroids (prednisone and others);

  • a diuretic (water pill), or medicine to treat high blood pressure;

  • aspirin to prevent stroke or heart attack (ibuprofen can make aspirin less effective in protecting your heart and blood vessels);

  • a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others;

  • antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others; or

  • other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Advil Allergy Sinus. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

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