Aflaxen

Name: Aflaxen

Uses of Aflaxen

Prescription

Naproxen is used to treat the following:

  • pain and redness
  • swelling and inflammation from conditions such as different types of arthritis and gout 
  • menstrual cramps
  • other types of short-term pain

Over-the-counter

Naproxen is used to temporarily reduce fever, as well as treat minor aches and pains due to:

  • minor pain of arthritis
  • menstrual cramps
  • the common cold
  • muscular aches
  • headache
  • backache
  • toothache

This medication may be prescribed for other uses.  Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Aflaxen Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with naproxen including:

  • Heart attack or stroke: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms…
    • shortness of breath
    • chest pain
    • weakness
    • slurring of speech
  • New hypertension or worsening of preexisting hypertension: Have your blood pressure watched by your doctor closely if taking naproxen, especially if you have a history of hypertension or are taking medications to treat hypertension.
  • Congestive heart failure: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms…
    • swelling in the arms or legs
    • shortness of breath
    • unexplained weight gain
    • fatigue
  • Serious and sometimes fatal skin reaction: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms…
    • rash
    • blistering
    • itching
    • fever
  • Stomach bleeding and ulceration (holes or sores of your stomach or intestines): Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms…
    • pain
    • blood in stools (black or tarry stools)
    • coughing up of blood
    • indigestion or general stomach discomfort
  • Liver toxicity: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms…
    • flu-like symptoms
    • itchiness
    • fatigue
    • nausea
    • yellow tinting of the skin or eyes
  • Kidney injury: Patients at greatest risk of this are those who already have renal dysfunction, heart failure, liver injury, those taking diuretics or ACE inhibitors, and the elderly.
  • Anaphylactoid reaction: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms…
    • swelling of the face or throat or trouble swallowing
    • difficulty breathing, coughing, chest tightness, wheezing
    • dizziness, fainting, rapid or weak heartbeat
    • flushing, itching, hives or a feeling of warmth
  • Pregnancy: In late pregnancy, naproxen should be avoided since it may cause premature closure of the ductus arteriosus.
  • Pre-existing asthma: Naproxen should not be taken in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma and should be used with caution in patients with preexisting asthma.
  • Anemia: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms…
    • Shortness of breath
    • Dizziness
    • Headache
    • Coldness in the hands and feet
    • Pale skin
    • Chest pain

Naproxen can cause dizziness or drowsiness.  Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how naproxen affects you.

Do not take naproxen if the following has occurred:

  • have had a hypersensitivity (allergic) reaction to naproxen
  • asthma, hives, or other allergic-type reactions after taking NSAIDs (including naproxen) other aspirin
  • coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery; naproxen is not to be used for treating pain before or after this surgery

Aflaxen and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy.  Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Naproxen falls into category C. This medication may be given to a pregnant woman if her healthcare provider believes that its benefits to the pregnant woman outweigh any possible risks to her unborn baby.

In addition, naproxen is known to cause heart defects on the developing fetus. Use during pregnancy, especially during late pregnancy, should be avoided.

Aflaxen Overdose

If you take too much naproxen, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

Usual Adult Dose for Bursitis

Immediate Release (naproxen sodium):
550 mg orally once, followed by 275 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours or 550 mg orally every 12 hours as needed
-Maximum dose: Initial total daily dose not to exceed 1375 mg; thereafter, not to exceed 1100 mg/day

Comments:
-Naproxen (Naprosyn[R]) may also but used, however, the delayed release tablets (EC-Naprosyn[R]) are not recommended for initial treatment of acute pain due to delayed absorption.

Controlled Release:
1000 mg orally once a day
-For patients requiring additional analgesia, may increase to 1500 mg orally once a day for a limited time; thereafter, total daily dose should not exceed 1000 mg/day

Uses: For the relief of signs and symptoms of bursitis and tendinitis

Usual Adult Dose for Pain

Immediate Release (naproxen sodium):
550 mg orally once, followed by 275 mg orally every 6 to 8 hours or 550 mg orally every 12 hours as needed
-Maximum dose: 1375 mg/day initial total daily dose; thereafter, not to exceed 1100 mg/day

Comments:
-Naproxen (Naprosyn[R]) may also but used, however, the delayed release tablets (EC-Naprosyn[R]) are not recommended for initial treatment of acute pain due to delayed absorption.

Controlled Release:
1000 mg orally once a day
-For patients requiring additional analgesia, may increase to 1500 mg orally once a day for a limited time; thereafter, total daily dose should not exceed 1000 mg/day

Over the Counter:
220 mg orally every 8 to 12 hours while symptoms persist
-May take 440 mg orally once in the first hour if needed
Maximum dose: 440 mg (in any 8 to 12 hour period); 660 mg (in any 24 hour period)

Uses: For the relief of mild to moderate pain

Other Comments

Administration advice:
-Take orally with a full glass of water; take with food or milk if stomach upset occurs.
-Oral Suspension: Shake gently before use; use with dosing device provided.
-Controlled and delayed release tablets: Do not break, crush, or chew.

Storage requirements:
-Dispense in light resistant containers.
-Oral Suspension: Avoid excessive heat above 40C (104F).

General:
-When treating acute painful conditions, the delayed release form is not recommended due to delay in absorption.
-Different dose strengths and dosage forms are not necessarily bioequivalent; differences should be taken into consideration when changing formulations.
-Prior to initiating treatment, the potential benefits and risks of this drug should be weighed against other treatment options.
-The lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals should be used.
-There is an increased risk of heart attack, heart failure, and stroke when taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); these events may occur at any time during treatment and risk increases with long term use, a history of cardiovascular (CV) disease or risk factors for CV disease, and higher doses.

Monitoring:
-Cardiovascular: Monitor blood pressure closely during initiation and throughout course of therapy.
-Gastrointestinal: Monitor for signs/symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding.
-Renal function: Monitor renal status, especially in patients with conditions where renal prostaglandins have a supportive role in the maintenance of renal perfusion.
-Monitor blood counts, renal, and hepatic function periodically for patients receiving long-term therapy.

Patient advice:
-Patients should seek medical advice for signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal events, adverse skin reactions, allergic reactions, hepatotoxicity, or unexplained weight gain or edema.
-Patients should seek medical attention immediately if signs/symptoms of cardiovascular events occur including, shortness of breath, slurred speech, chest pain, or weakness on one side of the body.
-Patients should talk to their health care provider if they are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding; this drug should not be used during pregnancy at 30 weeks gestation or later.

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