Ahist

Name: Ahist

Ahist Drug Class

Ahist is part of the drug class:

  • Substituted alkylamines

Uses of Ahist

  • It is used to ease allergy signs.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else's drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about Ahist, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about Ahist (chlorpheniramine tablets). It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using Ahist.

Review Date: October 4, 2017

Usual Adult Dose for Cold Symptoms

Tablets or syrup: 4 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours.
Sustained-release: 8 to 16 mg orally every 8 to 12 hours as needed or 16 mg orally once a day as needed.
Maximum dose 32 mg/day.

Usual Adult Dose for Urticaria

Tablets or syrup: 4 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours.
Sustained-release: 8 to 16 mg orally every 8 to 12 hours as needed or 16 mg orally once a day as needed.
Maximum dose 32 mg/day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cold Symptoms

3 months to 5 months:
Sustained-release syrup: 0.5 mg orally every 12 hours.

6 months to 8 months:
Sustained-release syrup: 1 mg orally every 12 hours.

9 months to 18 months:
Sustained-release syrup: 1 to 1.5 mg orally every 12 hours.

18 months to 6 years:
Sustained-release syrup: 2 mg orally every 12 hours.

2 to 5 years:
Tablets or syrup: 1 mg every 4 to 6 hours.
Sustained-release: 2 mg orally two times a day, not to exceed 8 mg in 24 hours.
Maximum dose 6 mg/day.

6 to 11 years:
Tablets or syrup: 2 mg every 4 to 6 hours.
Sustained-release: 4 to 8 mg orally two times a day, not to exceed 16 mg in 24 hours or 8 mg orally at bedtime or during the day as indicated.
Maximum dose 16 mg/day.

12 years or older:
Tablets or syrup: 4 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours.
Sustained-release: 8 to 16 mg orally every 8 to 12 hours as needed or 16 mg orally once a day as needed
Maximum dose 32 mg/day.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

The 100 mg/mL injection is for IM or subcutaneous use only.
The 10 mg/mL injection is for IV, IM, or subcutaneous use.

Chlorpheniramine Pregnancy Warnings

The Collaborative Perinatal Project monitored 1,070 first trimester exposures and 3,931 exposures which occurred anytime during pregnancy. No evidence was found to suggest a relationship to large categories of malformations. Antihistamine exposure in the first trimester in general was not associated with an increased risk of malformations.

Chlorpheniramine has been assigned to pregnancy category B by the FDA. Animal studies have not been reported. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Chlorpheniramine is only recommended for use during pregnancy when benefit outweighs risk.

Administrative Information

LactMed Record Number

64

Last Revision Date

20170110

Disclaimer

Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

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