Albuked human

Name: Albuked human

What happens if I miss a dose?

Because you will receive albumin in a clinical setting, you are not likely to miss a dose.

What should I avoid after receiving Albuked (albumin human)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Albuked (albumin human) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; cough, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregiver right away if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • weak or shallow breathing;

  • throbbing headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears;

  • anxiety, confusion, sweating, pale skin; or

  • severe shortness of breath, wheezing, gasping for breath, cough with foamy mucus, chest pain, and fast or uneven heart rate.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting;

  • fever, chills;

  • fast heart rate;

  • mild rash; or

  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

For the Consumer

Applies to albumin human: parenteral injection

Side effects include:

Anaphylactoid reactions, fever, chills, rash, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, hypotension.

Usual Adult Dose for Peritonitis

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Adult Dose for Pancreatitis

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Shock

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 10 to 15 mL per pound (4.5 to 6.8 mL per kg) of body weight IV is usually adequate accompanied by close surveillance of the child.

Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Albumin human Pregnancy Warnings

Albumin has been assigned to pregnancy category C by the FDA. Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted. It is not known whether albumin can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Albumin should only be given during pregnancy when benefit outweighs risk.

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