Altafed

Name: Altafed

Altafed Overview

Altafed is a brand name medication included in the following groups of medications: Other antihistamines for systemic use, Sympathomimetics. For more information about Altafed see its generics Pseudoephedrine, Triprolidine

Altafed Drug Class

Altafed is part of the drug classes:

  • Other antihistamines for systemic use

  • Sympathomimetics

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking pseudoephedrine and triprolidine?

Do not use this medicine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

You should not use this medication if you have severe constipation, a blockage in your stomach or intestines, or if you are unable to urinate.

Do not use this medicine if you have untreated or uncontrolled diseases such as glaucoma, asthma or COPD, high blood pressure, heart disease, coronary artery disease, or a thyroid disorder.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medication if you have:

  • a blockage in your digestive tract (stomach or intestines), a colostomy or ileostomy;

  • diabetes;

  • liver or kidney disease;

  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

  • cough with mucus, or cough caused by smoking, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis;

  • enlarged prostate or urination problems;

  • pheochromocytoma (an adrenal gland tumor); or

  • if you take potassium (Cytra, Epiklor, K-Lyte, K-Phos, Kaon, Klor-Con, Polycitra, Urocit-K).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether pseudoephedrine and triprolidine will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without medical advice if you are pregnant.

Pseudoephedrine and triprolidine may pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Antihistamines and decongestants may also slow breast milk production. Do not use this medicine without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Artificially sweetened cold medicine may contain phenylalanine. If you have phenylketonuria (PKU), check the medication label to see if the product contains phenylalanine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since this medicine is taken when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are taking the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What other drugs will affect pseudoephedrine and triprolidine?

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using this medicine if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as narcotic pain medication, sedatives, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by triprolidine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take pseudoephedrine and triprolidine if you are also using any of the following drugs:

  • atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine);

  • benztropine (Cogentin);

  • topiramate (Topamax);

  • zonisamide (Zonegran);

  • anti-nausea medications such as belladonna (Donnatal), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm Scop);

  • bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), solifenacin (Vesicare), tolterodine (Detrol), or Urogesic Blue;

  • bronchodilators such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);

  • irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Hyomax), or propantheline (Pro Banthine); or

  • ulcer medicine such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul) or mepenzolate (Cantil).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with pseudoephedrine and triprolidine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Dizziness.
  • Feeling nervous and excitable.
  • Not able to sleep.
  • Feeling sleepy.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

(web3)