Amethia Lo extended-cycle

Name: Amethia Lo extended-cycle

What is Amethia Lo (ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel extended-cycle)?

Ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel extended-cycle is a combination drug that contains female hormones that prevent ovulation (the release of an egg from an ovary). This medication also causes changes in your cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus and harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus.

Ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel extended-cycle is used as contraception to prevent pregnancy.

Ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel extended-cycle may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Missing a pill increases your risk of becoming pregnant.

If you miss one "active" pill, take two pills on the day that you remember. Then take one pill per day for the rest of the pack.

If you miss two "active" pills in a row, take two pills per day for two days in a row. Then take one pill per day for the rest of the pack. Use back-up birth control for at least 7 days following the missed pills.

If you miss three "active" pills in a row, do not take the missed pills. Continue taking 1 pill per day on schedule according to the pill package and leave the missed pills in the package. You may have some bleeding or spotting if you miss three pills in a row. Use back-up birth control for at least the next 7 days.

If you miss any reminder pills, throw them away and keep taking one pill per day until the pack is empty. You do not need back-up birth control if you miss a reminder pill. If your period does not start while you are taking the reminder pills, call your doctor because you might be pregnant.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking birth control pills?

Do not smoke while taking birth control pills, especially if you are older than 35 years of age.

Birth control pills will not protect you from sexually transmitted diseases--including HIV and AIDS. Using a condom is the only way to protect yourself from these diseases.

What other drugs will affect birth control pills?

Some drugs can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Other drugs may interact with ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

For the Consumer

Applies to ethinyl estradiol / levonorgestrel: oral tablet

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