Android

Name: Android

Android Overview

Android is a brand name medication included in the following groups of medications: 3 oxoandrosten 4 derivatives, Androgens and female sex hormones in combination with other drugs. For more information about Android see its generic Methyltestosterone

What is the most important information I should know about Android (methyltestosterone)?

Do not use this medicine if you are pregnant.

You should not use methyltestosterone if you have prostate cancer or male breast cancer.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking Android (methyltestosterone)?

You should not use methyltestosterone if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • prostate cancer;

  • male breast cancer; or

  • if you are pregnant or may become pregnant.

To make sure methyltestosterone is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • an enlarged prostate;

  • breast cancer;

  • heart disease, congestive heart failure;

  • liver or kidney disease; or

  • if you take a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven).

FDA pregnancy category X. This medicine can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Do not use methyltestosterone if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Use effective birth control while you are using methyltestosterone.

It is not known whether methyltestosterone passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Android?

  • If you have an allergy to methyltestosterone or any other part of Android (methyltestosterone).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you are male and have breast or prostate cancer.
  • If you are pregnant or may be pregnant. Do not take this medicine if you are pregnant.
  • If you are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Android.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else's drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about this medicine, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take Android or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to Android (methyltestosterone). This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Review Date: October 4, 2017

Indications and Usage for Android

1. Males

Androgens are indicated for replacement therapy in conditions associated with a deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone:

1. Primary hypogonadism (congenital or acquired) testicular failure due to cryptorchidism, bilateral torsion, orchitis, vanishing testis syndrome; or orchidectomy. 2. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (congenital or acquired) gonadotropin or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) deficiency, pituitary hypothalamic injury from tumors, trauma, or radiation. (Appropriate adrenal cortical and thyroid hormone replacement therapy are still necessary, however, and are actually of primary importance.) If the above conditions occur prior to puberty, androgen replacement therapy will be needed during the adolescent years for development of secondary sexual characteristics. Prolonged androgen treatment will be required to maintain sexual characteristics in these and other males who develop testosterone deficiency after puberty.   Safety and efficacy of Android® (methylTESTOSTERone) in men with “age-related hypogonadism” (also referred to as “late-onset hypogonadism”) have not been established. 3. Androgens may be used to stimulate puberty in carefully selected males with clearly delayed puberty. These patients usually have a familial pattern of delayed puberty that is not secondary to a pathological disorder; puberty is expected to occur spontaneously at a relatively late date. Brief treatment with conservative doses may occasionally be justified in these patients if they do not respond to psychological support. The potential adverse effect on bone maturation should be discussed with the patient and parents prior to androgen administration. An X-ray of the hand and wrist to determine bone age should be obtained every 6 months to assess the effect of treatment on the epiphyseal centers (see WARNINGS).

2. Females

Androgens may be used secondarily in women with advancing inoperable metastatic (skeletal) mammary cancer who are 1 to 5 years postmenopausal. Primary goals of therapy in these women include ablation of the ovaries. Other methods of counteracting estrogen activity are adrenalectomy, hypophysectomy, and/or antiestrogen therapy. This treatment has also been used in premenopausal women with breast cancer who have benefitted from oophorectomy and are considered to have a hormone-responsive tumor. Judgment concerning androgen therapy should be made by an oncologist with expertise in this field.

Drug Abuse and Dependence

Controlled Substance

Android Capsules contain testosterone, a Schedule III controlled substance in the Controlled Substances Act.

Abuse

Drug abuse is intentional non-therapeutic use of a drug, even once, for its rewarding psychological and physiological effects. Abuse and misuse of testosterone are seen in male and female adults and adolescents. Testosterone, often in combination with other anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), and not obtained by prescription through a pharmacy, may be abused by athletes and bodybuilders. There have been reports of misuse by men taking higher doses of legally obtained testosterone than prescribed and continuing testosterone despite adverse events or against medical advice.

Abuse-Related Adverse Reactions

Serious adverse reactions have been reported in individuals who abuse anabolic androgenic steroids and include cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, hepatotoxicity, and serious psychiatric manifestations, including major depression, mania, paranoia, psychosis, delusions, hallucinations, hostility and aggression.

The following adverse reactions have also been reported in men: transient ischemic attacks, convulsions, hypomania, irritability, dyslipidemias, testicular atrophy, subfertility, and infertility.

The following additional adverse reactions have been reported in women: hirsutism, virilization, deepening of voice, clitoral enlargement, breast atrophy, male-pattern baldness, and menstrual irregularities.

The following adverse reactions have been reported in male and female adolescents: premature closure of bony epiphyses with termination of growth, and precocious puberty.

Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size and may include abuse of other agents, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Dependence

Behaviors Associated with Addiction

Continued abuse of testosterone and other anabolic steroids, leading to addiction is characterized by the following behaviors:

• Taking greater dosages than prescribed • Continued drug use despite medical and social problems due to drug use • Spending significant time to obtain the drug when supplies of the drug are interrupted • Giving a higher priority to drug use than other obligations • Having difficulty in discontinuing the drug despite desires and attempts to do so • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms upon abrupt discontinuation of use

Physical dependence is characterized by withdrawal symptoms after abrupt drug discontinuation or a significant dose reduction of a drug. Individuals taking supratherapeutic doses of testosterone may experience withdrawal symptoms lasting for weeks or months which include depressed mood, major depression, fatigue, craving, restlessness, irritability, anorexia, insomnia, decreased libido and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Drug dependence in individuals using approved doses of testosterone for approved indications has not been documented.

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