Anti-Itch

Name: Anti-Itch

Uses of Anti-Itch

  • It is used to ease pain.
  • It is used to treat itching.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Anti-Itch?

  • If you have an allergy to diphenhydramine or any other part of Anti-Itch (diphenhydramine (topical)).
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If a large area needs to be treated.

This medicine may interact with other drugs or health problems.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Anti-Itch?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take Anti-Itch. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • Do not use with other products that have diphenhydramine.
  • Talk with the doctor if the area has open wounds or very bad skin irritation.
  • This medicine may cause harm if swallowed. If this medicine is swallowed, call a doctor or poison control center right away.
  • Different brands of Anti-Itch may be for use in different ages of children. Talk with the doctor before giving this medicine to a child.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using Anti-Itch while you are pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Very bad skin irritation.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else's drugs.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your doctor.
  • Talk with the doctor before starting any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about this medicine, please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take Anti-Itch or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to Anti-Itch (diphenhydramine (topical)). This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Review Date: October 4, 2017

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to diphenhydramine topical: topical cream, topical gel, topical spray, topical stick

General

No side effects have been reported with the use of diphenhydramine topical.[Ref]

Some side effects of diphenhydramine topical may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

Diphenhydramine topical Pregnancy Warnings

The Collaborative Perinatal Project reported 595 first-trimester exposures and 2,948 exposures anytime during pregnancy. No relationship was found to large categories of malformations. Possible associations with individual malformation were found. One study reported a statistical relationship between oral diphenhydramine use in the first trimester and cleft palate. One case of withdrawal in an infant whose mother ingested 150 mg per day of oral diphenhydramine has been reported. This infant developed tremor on the fifth day of life which was treated with phenobarbital. A review of prenatal drug use in 3026 women with premature infants demonstrated an increased risk of retrolental fibroplasia with antihistamine use during the last two weeks of pregnancy. The dosage used or the particular antihistamine was not specified. The incidence of retrolental fibroplasia in premature infants exposed in utero to antihistamine during this time was 21% compared to 11% in premature infants not exposed. Oral diphenhydramine has been shown to have oxytocic effects in animal and human uteri. One case report of a pregnant woman who ingested a large amount of diphenhydramine in an attempted suicide developed strong, regular uterine contractions that were halted by the administration of intravenous magnesium. Because of the large amount of diphenhydramine ingested by this pregnant woman in her attempted suicide and the small amount absorbed through the skin into systemic circulation, oxytocic effects would not necessarily be expected in pregnant women using the topical form of diphenhydramine.

Diphenhydramine has been assigned to pregnancy category B by the FDA. Animal studies have failed to reveal teratogenicity. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Diphenhydramine topical should be used during pregnancy only when need has been clearly established.

Diphenhydramine topical Breastfeeding Warnings

There are no data on the excretion of diphenhydramine topical into human milk. However, orally administered diphenhydramine is excreted into human milk. Diphenhydramine may also inhibit lactation. The manufacturer of diphenhydramine topical has no lactation warning in the product labeling. However, the manufacturer of oral diphenhydramine recommends that due to the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants, a decision should be made to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. Potential risk from diphenhydramine would be expected to vary with the amount of the drug the mother (and therefore, the child) absorbs into their body.

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