Aranelle birth control

Name: Aranelle birth control

What is Aranelle (ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone birth control)?

Ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone is a combination drug that contains female hormones that prevent ovulation (the release of an egg from an ovary). This medication also causes changes in your cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus and harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus.

Ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone is used as contraception to prevent pregnancy.

There are many brands and forms of ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone available. Not all brands are listed on this leaflet, and not all brands are used for contraception.

Ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

How should I take birth control pills?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

You will take your first pill on the first day of your period or on the first Sunday after your period begins. You may need to use back-up birth control, such as condoms or a spermicide, when you first start using this medication. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Take one pill every day, no more than 24 hours apart. When the pills run out, start a new pack the following day. You may get pregnant if you do not take one pill daily. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of pills completely.

The 28 day birth control pack contains seven "reminder" pills to keep you on your regular cycle. Your period will usually begin while you are using these reminder pills.

You may have breakthrough bleeding, especially during the first 3 months. Tell your doctor if this bleeding continues or is very heavy.

Use a back-up birth control if you are sick with severe vomiting or diarrhea.

If you need surgery or medical tests or if you will be on bed rest, you may need to stop using this medication for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using birth control pills.

While taking birth control pills, you will need to visit your doctor regularly.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Birth control pills side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • signs of a stroke--sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;

  • signs of a blood clot--chest pain, sudden cough, wheezing, coughing up blood, swelling or warmth in one or both legs;

  • heart attack symptoms--chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating;

  • vision changes;

  • a change in the pattern or severity of migraine headaches;

  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

  • a breast lump; or

  • symptoms of depression--sleep problems, weakness, tired feeling, mood changes.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting;

  • breast tenderness or swelling;

  • freckles or darkening of facial skin, increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair;

  • changes in weight or appetite;

  • problems with contact lenses;

  • vaginal itching or discharge; or

  • changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect birth control pills?

Some drugs can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Other drugs may be affected by birth control pills. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

For the Consumer

Applies to ethinyl estradiol / norethindrone: oral capsule liquid filled, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable

Other dosage forms:

  • oral tablet, oral tablet chewable

Along with its needed effects, ethinyl estradiol / norethindrone may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking ethinyl estradiol / norethindrone:

Incidence not known
  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • absent, missed, or irregular menstrual periods
  • anxiety
  • change in vision
  • changes in skin color
  • chest pain or discomfort
  • chills
  • clay-colored stools
  • constipation
  • cough
  • dark urine
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness or lightheadedness
  • fainting
  • fast heartbeat
  • fever
  • headache
  • hives or welts
  • itching skin
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • loss of appetite
  • medium to heavy, irregular vaginal bleeding between regular monthly periods, which may require the use of a pad or a tampon
  • nausea and vomiting
  • pain or discomfort in the arms, jaw, back, or neck
  • pain, tenderness, or swelling of the foot or leg
  • pains in the chest, groin, or legs, especially in the calves of the legs
  • pounding in the ears
  • rash
  • redness of the skin
  • severe headaches of sudden onset
  • slow or fast heartbeat
  • sudden loss of coordination or slurred speech
  • sudden onset of shortness of breath for no apparent reason
  • sudden shortness of breath or troubled breathing
  • sweating
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting of blood

Some side effects of ethinyl estradiol / norethindrone may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known
  • Abdominal or stomach cramps
  • bloating
  • blotchy spots on the exposed skin
  • breast enlargement or tenderness
  • discouragement
  • feeling sad or empty
  • irritability
  • itching of the vagina or outside genitals
  • loss of interest or pleasure
  • pain during sexual intercourse
  • thick, white curd-like vaginal discharge without odor or with mild odor
  • tiredness
  • trouble concentrating
  • trouble sleeping
  • trouble wearing contact lenses

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