Arrestin

Name: Arrestin

Uses For Arrestin

Trimethobenzamide is used to treat nausea and vomiting .

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription .

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting

-Oral: 300 mg orally 3 or 4 times a day
-Injection: 200 mg IM 3 or 4 times a day

Comments: Dosage should be adjusted according to the therapy indication, symptom severity, and patient response.

Use: Treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting, and nausea associated with gastroenteritis.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Nausea/Vomiting

-Oral: The manufacturer gives no specific dosing instructions; Caution recommended.
-Injection: Contraindicated

Comments: This drug should be avoided in children whose signs and symptoms could represent Reye's syndrome.

Use: Treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting, and nausea associated with gastroenteritis.

Renal Dose Adjustments

CrCl 70 mL/min/1.73 m2 or less: Dosing modifications such as reducing the total dose at each dosing or increasing the dosing interval should be considered; Caution is recommended.

Dose Adjustments

CrCl 70 mL/min/1.73 m2 or less: Dosing modifications such as reducing the total dose at each dosing or increasing the dosing interval should be considered; Caution is recommended.

Precautions

Consult WARNINGS section for additional precautions.

Dialysis

Data not available

Trimethobenzamide Pregnancy Warnings

Safety in pregnancy has not been established. US FDA pregnancy category: Not formally assigned to a pregnancy category. Comments: It is unknown if this drug crosses the placenta, but its molecular weight (about 389 for the free base) suggests that exposure to the embryo-fetus should be expected.

Some data show no adverse effects in fetuses when this drug was used in pregnancy to treat nausea and vomiting. However, a study of 193 pregnant patients treated with this drug in the 1st trimester showed incidences of severe congenital defects at 1 month (2.6%), 1 year (2.6%), and 5 years (5.8%); the study authors determined that there is a low risk of congenital malformations since other factors (including the use of other antiemetics in some patients) may have contributed to the results. Animal studies failed to reveal any evidence of teratogenicity. Increased resorptions and stillborn pups were observed, but these adverse effects occurred in only 1 to 2 dams in each study.

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