Arsenic trioxide Intravenous

Name: Arsenic trioxide Intravenous

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

  • Trisenox

Available Dosage Forms:

  • Solution

Therapeutic Class: Antineoplastic Agent

Uses For arsenic trioxide

Arsenic trioxide injection is used to treat a type of leukemia (cancer of the blood cells) called acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in patients who have not responded to other medication regimens. It may also be used to treat other kinds of cancer, as determined by your doctor.

Arsenic trioxide belongs to the general group of medicines called antineoplastics. It interferes with the growth of cancer cells, which are eventually destroyed. Since the growth of normal body cells may also be affected by arsenic trioxide, other unwanted effects will also occur. Some of these may be serious and must be reported to your doctor.

Before you begin treatment with arsenic trioxide, you and your doctor should talk about the benefit of arsenic trioxide as well as the risks of using it.

arsenic trioxide is to be given only by or under the immediate supervision of your doctor.

Before Using arsenic trioxide

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For arsenic trioxide, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to arsenic trioxide or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of arsenic trioxide injection in children. However, safety and efficacy have not been established in children younger than 4 years of age.

Geriatric

Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of arsenic trioxide injection have not been performed in the geriatric population, geriatric-specific problems are not expected to limit the usefulness of arsenic trioxide injection in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney or liver problems, which may require caution in patients receiving arsenic trioxide. .

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving arsenic trioxide, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using arsenic trioxide with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Amifampridine
  • Amisulpride
  • Bepridil
  • Cisapride
  • Dronedarone
  • Foscarnet
  • Lidoflazine
  • Mesoridazine
  • Pimozide
  • Piperaquine
  • Saquinavir
  • Sparfloxacin
  • Terfenadine
  • Thioridazine
  • Ziprasidone

Using arsenic trioxide with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acecainide
  • Acetazolamide
  • Ajmaline
  • Alfuzosin
  • Amiloride
  • Amiodarone
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amoxapine
  • Amphotericin B
  • Anagrelide
  • Apomorphine
  • Aprindine
  • Aripiprazole
  • Aripiprazole Lauroxil
  • Artemether
  • Asenapine
  • Astemizole
  • Atazanavir
  • Azimilide
  • Azithromycin
  • Azosemide
  • Bedaquiline
  • Bemetizide
  • Bendroflumethiazide
  • Benzthiazide
  • Bretylium
  • Bumetanide
  • Buserelin
  • Buthiazide
  • Canrenoate
  • Canrenone
  • Chloral Hydrate
  • Chloroquine
  • Chlorothiazide
  • Chlorpromazine
  • Chlorthalidone
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Citalopram
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clomipramine
  • Clopamide
  • Clozapine
  • Crizotinib
  • Cyclobenzaprine
  • Cyclothiazide
  • Dabrafenib
  • Dasatinib
  • Degarelix
  • Delamanid
  • Desipramine
  • Deslorelin
  • Deutetrabenazine
  • Diazoxide
  • Dibenzepin
  • Disopyramide
  • Dofetilide
  • Dolasetron
  • Domperidone
  • Donepezil
  • Doxepin
  • Droperidol
  • Ebastine
  • Efavirenz
  • Encainide
  • Enflurane
  • Eplerenone
  • Eribulin
  • Erythromycin
  • Escitalopram
  • Ethacrynic Acid
  • Etozolin
  • Famotidine
  • Felbamate
  • Fenquizone
  • Fingolimod
  • Flecainide
  • Fluconazole
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fosphenytoin
  • Furosemide
  • Galantamine
  • Gatifloxacin
  • Gemifloxacin
  • Glycerin
  • Gonadorelin
  • Goserelin
  • Granisetron
  • Halofantrine
  • Haloperidol
  • Halothane
  • Histrelin
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Hydroflumethiazide
  • Hydroquinidine
  • Hydroxychloroquine
  • Hydroxyzine
  • Ibutilide
  • Iloperidone
  • Imipramine
  • Indapamide
  • Isoflurane
  • Isradipine
  • Itraconazole
  • Ivabradine
  • Ketoconazole
  • Lapatinib
  • Leuprolide
  • Levofloxacin
  • Levomethadyl
  • Lopinavir
  • Lorcainide
  • Lumefantrine
  • Mannitol
  • Mefloquine
  • Methadone
  • Methyclothiazide
  • Metolazone
  • Metronidazole
  • Mifepristone
  • Mizolastine
  • Moxifloxacin
  • Nafarelin
  • Nelfinavir
  • Nilotinib
  • Norfloxacin
  • Nortriptyline
  • Octreotide
  • Ofloxacin
  • Olanzapine
  • Ondansetron
  • Paliperidone
  • Panobinostat
  • Paroxetine
  • Pasireotide
  • Pazopanib
  • Pentamidine
  • Perphenazine
  • Pimavanserin
  • Pipamperone
  • Piretanide
  • Pirmenol
  • Pitolisant
  • Polythiazide
  • Posaconazole
  • Prajmaline
  • Probucol
  • Procainamide
  • Prochlorperazine
  • Promethazine
  • Propafenone
  • Protriptyline
  • Quetiapine
  • Quinethazone
  • Quinidine
  • Quinine
  • Ranolazine
  • Ribociclib
  • Rilpivirine
  • Risperidone
  • Ritonavir
  • Salmeterol
  • Sematilide
  • Sertindole
  • Sevoflurane
  • Sodium Phosphate
  • Sodium Phosphate, Dibasic
  • Sodium Phosphate, Monobasic
  • Solifenacin
  • Sorafenib
  • Sotalol
  • Spiramycin
  • Spironolactone
  • Sulfamethoxazole
  • Sulpiride
  • Sultopride
  • Sunitinib
  • Tacrolimus
  • Tamoxifen
  • Tedisamil
  • Telaprevir
  • Telavancin
  • Telithromycin
  • Tetrabenazine
  • Ticrynafen
  • Tizanidine
  • Tolterodine
  • Toremifene
  • Torsemide
  • Trazodone
  • Triamterene
  • Trichlormethiazide
  • Trifluoperazine
  • Trimethoprim
  • Trimipramine
  • Triptorelin
  • Urea
  • Vandetanib
  • Vardenafil
  • Vasopressin
  • Vemurafenib
  • Venlafaxine
  • Vinflunine
  • Voriconazole
  • Vorinostat
  • Xipamide
  • Zotepine
  • Zuclopenthixol

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of arsenic trioxide. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Congestive heart failure or
  • Heart block or
  • Heart rhythm problems (eg, prolonged QT interval or torsade de pointes), history of or
  • Hypokalemia (low potassium in the blood) or
  • Hypomagnesemia (low magnesium in the blood)—These medical problems may increase the risk of experiencing a life threatening heart rhythm problem while taking arsenic trioxide.
  • Kidney disease, severe or
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use of arsenic trioxide

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you or your child arsenic trioxide in a hospital or cancer clinic. arsenic trioxide is given through a needle placed in one of your veins.

Arsenic trioxide often causes nausea and vomiting. However, it is very important that you continue to receive the medicine, even if you have an upset stomach. Ask your doctor for ways to lessen these effects.

Precautions

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to arsenic; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially: kidney disease, diabetes.

Arsenic trioxide may cause a condition that affects the heart rhythm (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can rarely cause serious (rarely fatal) fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms (such as severe dizziness, fainting) that need medical attention right away.

The risk of QT prolongation may be increased if you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that may cause QT prolongation. Before using arsenic trioxide, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take and if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), family history of certain heart problems (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).

Low levels of potassium or magnesium in the blood may also increase your risk of QT prolongation. This risk may increase if you use certain drugs (such as diuretics/"water pills") or if you have conditions such as severe sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. Talk to your doctor about using arsenic trioxide safely.

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

Arsenic trioxide can make you more likely to get infections or may worsen any current infections. Therefore, wash your hands well to prevent the spread of infection. Avoid contact with people who have infections that may spread to others (such as chickenpox, measles, flu). Consult your doctor if you have been exposed to an infection or for more details.

Do not have immunizations/vaccinations without the consent of your doctor. Avoid contact with people who have recently received live vaccines (such as flu vaccine inhaled through the nose).

To lower the chance of getting cut, bruised, or injured, use caution with sharp objects like razors and nail cutters, and avoid activities such as contact sports.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially QT prolongation (see above).

This drug should not be used during pregnancy. It may harm the unborn baby. If you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant, tell your doctor right away. Talk with your doctor about effective forms of birth control.

This medication passes into breast milk. Because of the possible risk to the infant, breast-feeding while using this drug is not recommended. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

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