Ascocid

Name: Ascocid

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

  • Ascocid
  • C-500
  • Cecon
  • Cemill 1000
  • Cemill 500
  • Cevi-Bid
  • C-Time w/Rose Hips
  • Mega-C
  • One-Gram C
  • Protexin
  • Sunkist Vitamin C

In Canada

  • Ce-Vi-Sol
  • Revitalose-C-1000
  • Revitonus C-1000 Yellow Ampule
  • Vitamin C Powder

Available Dosage Forms:

  • Tablet
  • Powder
  • Powder for Solution
  • Capsule, Liquid Filled
  • Tablet, Chewable
  • Solution
  • Granule
  • Capsule
  • Syrup
  • Powder for Suspension
  • Liquid
  • Tablet, Extended Release
  • Lozenge/Troche
  • Capsule, Extended Release
  • Wafer

Therapeutic Class: Nutritive Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Vitamin C (class)

Importance of Diet

For good health, it is important that you eat a balanced and varied diet. Follow carefully any diet program your health care professional may recommend. For your specific dietary vitamin and/or mineral needs, ask your health care professional for a list of appropriate foods. If you think that you are not getting enough vitamins and/or minerals in your diet, you may choose to take a dietary supplement.

Vitamin C is found in various foods, including citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, grapefruit), green vegetables (peppers, broccoli, cabbage), tomatoes, and potatoes. It is best to eat fresh fruits and vegetables whenever possible since they contain the most vitamins. Food processing may destroy some of the vitamins. For example, exposure to air, drying, salting, or cooking (especially in copper pots), mincing of fresh vegetables, or mashing potatoes may reduce the amount of vitamin C in foods. Freezing does not usually cause loss of vitamin C unless foods are stored for a very long time.

Vitamins alone will not take the place of a good diet and will not provide energy. Your body also needs other substances found in food such as protein, minerals, carbohydrates, and fat. Vitamins themselves often cannot work without the presence of other foods.

The daily amount of vitamin C needed is defined in several different ways.

    For U.S.—
  • Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) are the amount of vitamins and minerals needed to provide for adequate nutrition in most healthy persons. RDAs for a given nutrient may vary depending on a person's age, sex, and physical condition (e.g., pregnancy).
  • Daily Values (DVs) are used on food and dietary supplement labels to indicate the percent of the recommended daily amount of each nutrient that a serving provides. DV replaces the previous designation of United States Recommended Daily Allowances (USRDAs).
    For Canada—
  • Recommended Nutrient Intakes (RNIs) are used to determine the amounts of vitamins, minerals, and protein needed to provide adequate nutrition and lessen the risk of chronic disease.

Normal daily recommended intakes for vitamin C are generally defined as follows:

Persons U.S.
(mg)
Canada
(mg)
Infants and children
Birth to 3 years of age
30–40 20
4 to 6 years of age 45 25
7 to 10 years of age 45 25
Adolescent and adult males 50–60 25–40
Adolescent and adult females 50–60 25–30
Pregnant females 70 30–40
Breast-feeding females 90–95 55
Smokers 100 45–60

Before Using Ascocid

If you are taking this dietary supplement without a prescription, carefully read and follow any precautions on the label. For this supplement, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Problems in children have not been reported with intake of normal daily recommended amounts.

Geriatric

Problems in older adults have not been reported with intake of normal daily recommended amounts.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this dietary supplement, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this dietary supplement with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Amygdalin
  • Deferoxamine

Using this dietary supplement with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Indinavir

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this dietary supplement. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Blood problems—High doses of vitamin C may cause certain blood problems
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus—Very high doses of vitamin C may interfere with tests for sugar in the urine
  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency—High doses of vitamin C may cause hemolytic anemia
  • Kidney stones (history of)—High doses of vitamin C may increase risk of kidney stones in the urinary tract

Precautions While Using Ascocid

Vitamin C is not stored in the body. If you take more than you need, the extra vitamin C will pass into your urine. Very large doses may also interfere with tests for sugar in diabetics and with tests for blood in the stool.

Ascocid Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common or rare - with high doses
  • Side or lower back pain

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common or rare - with high doses
  • Diarrhea
  • dizziness or faintness (with the injection only)
  • flushing or redness of skin
  • headache
  • increase in urination (mild)
  • nausea or vomiting
  • stomach cramps

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Side Effects

Consult your pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to ascorbic acid: compounding powder, injectable solution, oral capsule, oral gum, oral liquid, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable, oral tablet disintegrating, oral tablet extended release

Renal

Renal side effects have included oxalate and urate kidney stones.[Ref]

Hyperoxaluria appears to be dose-related.[Ref]

Nervous system

Migraine headache has been reported with a daily dose of 6 grams.

The manufacturer reports temporary dizziness and faintness may be associated with too rapid of a rate during intravenous administration.[Ref]

Nervous system side effects have included dizziness, faintness, fatigue, and headache in less than 1% of patients. Migraine headache has also been reported.[Ref]

Other

Conditional scurvy is reported to occur following excessive doses of ascorbic acid (the active ingredient contained in Ascocid) over a prolonged period of time. The mechanism of action for this condition is thought to be that large doses of ascorbic acid condition the patient over time for rapid clearance of ascorbic acid resulting in scurvy. The plasma levels of ascorbic acid appear to remain within normal limits. The actual existence of conditional scurvy remains controversial.[Ref]

Other side effects have included flank pain in less than 1% of patients. Conditional scurvy has also been reported.[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects have included nausea, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and esophagitis.[Ref]

Nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps appears to be associated with doses exceeding 2 g per day, although there have been some reports with as little as 1 g per day.

Esophagitis appears to be associated with prolonged or increased contact of ascorbic acid tablets with the esophageal mucosa.[Ref]

Hematologic

The majority of hemolysis reports have been associated with patients who have concurrent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.[Ref]

Hematologic side effects have included hemolysis.[Ref]

Local

Local side effects have included transient mild soreness at the site of injection.[Ref]

Some side effects of Ascocid may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

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