Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts

Name: Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts

What is Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts (ascorbic acid)?

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) occurs naturally in foods such as citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Vitamin C is important for bones and connective tissues, muscles, and blood vessels. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron, which is needed for red blood cell production.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Ascorbic acid may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts (ascorbic acid)?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts (ascorbic acid)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to ascorbic acid: compounding powder, injectable solution, oral capsule, oral gum, oral liquid, oral tablet, oral tablet chewable, oral tablet disintegrating, oral tablet extended release

Renal

Renal side effects have included oxalate and urate kidney stones.[Ref]

Hyperoxaluria appears to be dose-related.[Ref]

Nervous system

Migraine headache has been reported with a daily dose of 6 grams.

The manufacturer reports temporary dizziness and faintness may be associated with too rapid of a rate during intravenous administration.[Ref]

Nervous system side effects have included dizziness, faintness, fatigue, and headache in less than 1% of patients. Migraine headache has also been reported.[Ref]

Other

Conditional scurvy is reported to occur following excessive doses of ascorbic acid (the active ingredient contained in Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts) over a prolonged period of time. The mechanism of action for this condition is thought to be that large doses of ascorbic acid condition the patient over time for rapid clearance of ascorbic acid resulting in scurvy. The plasma levels of ascorbic acid appear to remain within normal limits. The actual existence of conditional scurvy remains controversial.[Ref]

Other side effects have included flank pain in less than 1% of patients. Conditional scurvy has also been reported.[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects have included nausea, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and esophagitis.[Ref]

Nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps appears to be associated with doses exceeding 2 g per day, although there have been some reports with as little as 1 g per day.

Esophagitis appears to be associated with prolonged or increased contact of ascorbic acid tablets with the esophageal mucosa.[Ref]

Hematologic

The majority of hemolysis reports have been associated with patients who have concurrent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.[Ref]

Hematologic side effects have included hemolysis.[Ref]

Local

Local side effects have included transient mild soreness at the site of injection.[Ref]

Some side effects of Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

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