Atrovent Nasal

Name: Atrovent Nasal

Ipratropium Nasal Interactions

Avoid getting this medicine in your eyes.

This medicine may cause blurred vision and may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Other drugs may interact with ipratropium nasal, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

How should I use Atrovent Nasal (ipratropium nasal)?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

This medicine comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use, and directions for priming the nasal spray pump. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Ipratropium nasal is usually used for only a short time, such as 4 days for the common cold or 3 weeks for allergy symptoms. Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the cap tightly closed when not in use. Do not allow the medicine to freeze.

What should I avoid while using Atrovent Nasal (ipratropium nasal)?

Avoid getting this medicine in your eyes.

This medicine may cause blurred vision and may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Ipratropium nasal Pregnancy Warnings

Ipratropium has been assigned to pregnancy category B by the FDA. Animal studies have failed to reveal evidence of teratogenicity. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Ipratropium is only recommended for use during pregnancy benefit outweighs risk.

Ipratropium nasal Breastfeeding Warnings

There are no data on the excretion of ipratropium into human milk. Due to low serum concentrations obtained with oral inhalation and intranasal administration, as well as poor absorption of ipratropium from the gastrointestinal tract, it is unlikely that the drug would reach a nursing infant in an appreciable amount. The manufacturer recommends that caution be used when administering ipratropium nasal to nursing women.

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