Baygam

Name: Baygam

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take BayGam?

  • If you have an allergy to immune globulin or any other part of this medicine.
  • If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If you have IgA deficiency.
  • If you have too much proline in your blood (hyperprolinemia).
  • If you have low platelet levels.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with BayGam.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

For the Consumer

Applies to immune globulin intravenous: powder for solution, solution

Along with its needed effects, immune globulin intravenous may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking immune globulin intravenous:

More common
  • Chills
  • cough
  • fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse
  • fever
  • noisy breathing
  • tightness in the chest
  • troubled breathing
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
Less common
  • Bluish coloring of the lips or nail beds
  • burning sensation in the head
  • faintness or lightheadedness
Rare
  • Difficulty with swallowing
  • hives or welts
  • itching, especially of the feet or hands
  • reddening of the skin, especially around the ears
  • swelling of the eyes, face, or inside of the nose
Incidence not known
  • Back, leg, or stomach pains
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • change in vision
  • changes in urination
  • chest pain or discomfort
  • cold, clammy, or pale skin
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
  • fever
  • headache that is severe and occurs suddenly
  • light-colored stools
  • loss of consciousness
  • low blood pressure or pulse
  • muscle spasm or jerking of all extremities
  • nausea or vomiting
  • pains in the chest, groin, or legs, especially calves of the legs
  • shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet
  • skin blisters
  • slow breathing
  • slurred speech that occurs suddenly
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips
  • sudden, severe weakness or numbness in the arm or leg
  • sweating
  • swelling in the legs and ankles
  • tightness in the chest
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects of immune globulin intravenous may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
  • Diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • joint pain
  • muscle pain
  • redness, swelling, itching, or pain at the injection site
  • skin rash
Less common
  • Hip pain
  • leg cramps
Incidence not known
  • Feeling of warmth
  • redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  • stomach pain
  • swollen glands
  • tiredness
  • weakness

Usual Pediatric Dose for Kawasaki Disease

Gammagard S/D(R):

1 gram/kg, IV, once
or
400 mg/kg, IV, for 4 consecutive days

Comments:
-Begin within 7 days of onset of fever.
-Administer concomitant aspirin (80 to 100 mg/kg/day in 4 divided doses).

Use: Prevention of coronary artery aneurysms associated with Kawasaki syndrome in pediatric patients.

Dialysis

Data not available

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Usual Adult Dose for Varicella-Zoster

If varicella zoster immune globulin is not available, immune globulin intramuscular at a dose of 0.6 to 1.2 mL/kg, promptly given, may also modify varicella.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hepatitis A

The safety and efficacy of immune globulin intramuscular have not been established in pediatric patients. However, immune globulin intramuscular may be appropriate for use in some situations.

Household or institutional hepatitis A case contacts:
0.02 mL/kg

Persons who plan to travel to areas where hepatitis A is common.
Length of stay;
< 3 months: 0.02 mL/kg
3 months or longer: 0.06 mL/kg (repeat every 4 to 6 months)

Precautions

Do not administer IV.

In most people the intradermal injection of concentrated gamma globulin solution with its buffers causes a localized area of inflammation which can be misinterpreted as a positive allergic reaction. In actuality, this does not represent an allergic reaction. It is a localized tissue irritation of a chemical nature. Skin tests should not be done.

Immune globulin intramuscular is made from human plasma and may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, that can cause disease.

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