Belladonna and Opium

Name: Belladonna and Opium

Pharmacology

The pharmacologically active agents present in the belladonna component are atropine and scopolamine. Atropine blocks the action of acetylcholine at parasympathetic sites in smooth muscle, secretory glands, and the CNS causing a relaxation of smooth muscle and drying of secretions. The principle agent in opium is morphine. Morphine binds to opiate receptors in the CNS, causing inhibition of ascending pain pathways, altering the perception of and response to pain.

Absorption

Rectal absorption is dependent upon body hydration, not temperature

Metabolism

Hepatic

What is the most important information i should know about belladonna and opium (b & o supprettes 15-a, b & o supprettes 16-a)?

Do not take belladonna and opium rectal by mouth. It is for use only in your rectum.

You should not use belladonna and opium if you have glaucoma, a muscle disorder, severe breathing problems, diarrhea caused by infection, severe liver or kidney disease, seizures, severe bleeding, a history of head injury, if you are debilitated, or if you have recently used drugs or alcohol.

There are many other drugs that should not be used together with belladonna and opium rectal. Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use.

Before using belladonna and opium, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.

Opium may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

What should i discuss with my health care provider before using belladonna and opium rectal (b & o supprettes 15-a, b & o supprettes 16-a)?

Do not use this medication if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Do not use belladonna and opium if you are also using linezolid (Zyvox), pramlintide (Symlin), procarbazine (Matulane), naltrexone (ReVia, Vivitrol), or potassium supplement tablets or capsules.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to belladonna or opium, or if you have:

  • glaucoma;
  • urination problems or an enlarged prostate;
  • severe liver or kidney disease;
  • a blockage in your stomach or intestines;
  • a history of head injury or brain tumor;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • diarrhea caused by infection;
  • severe bleeding;
  • a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;
  • asthma or severe breathing disorder;
  • if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, or other narcotic medications; or
  • if you are bed-ridden or otherwise debilitated.

To make sure you can safely use belladonna and opium, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • liver or kidney disease;
  • heart disease, high or low blood pressure;
  • a stomach or intestinal disorder;
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or other breathing problems;
  • depression or mental illness;
  • curvature of the spine;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorders;
  • underactive thyroid;
  • drug or alcohol addiction; or
  • an allergy to atropine or any narcotic pain medicine such as hydrocodone (Lortab, Vicodin), morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, Oramorph, and others), oxycodone (OxyContin), and others.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether belladonna and opium will harm an unborn baby. Opium may cause addiction or withdrawal symptoms in a newborn if the mother uses the medication during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether belladonna and opium passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Opium may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share this medication with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

(web3)