Benylin Pediatric Formula

Name: Benylin Pediatric Formula

Uses For Benylin Pediatric Formula

Dextromethorphan is used to relieve coughs due to colds or influenza (flu). It should not be used for chronic cough that occurs with smoking, asthma, or emphysema or when there is an unusually large amount of mucus or phlegm (flem) with the cough.

Dextromethorphan relieves cough by acting directly on the cough center in the brain.

This medicine is available without a prescription.

Do not give any over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicine to a baby or child under 4 years of age. Using these medicines in very young children might cause serious or possibly life-threatening side effects .

Benylin Pediatric Formula Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Symptoms of overdose
  • Blurred vision
  • confusion
  • difficulty in urination
  • drowsiness or dizziness
  • nausea or vomiting (severe)
  • shakiness and unsteady walk
  • slowed breathing
  • unusual excitement, nervousness, restlessness, or irritability (severe)

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common or rare
  • Confusion
  • constipation
  • dizziness (mild)
  • drowsiness (mild)
  • headache
  • nausea or vomiting
  • stomach pain

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is dextromethorphan?

Dextromethorphan is a cough suppressant. It affects the signals in the brain that trigger cough reflex.

Dextromethorphan is used to treat a cough.

Dextromethorphan will not treat a cough that is caused by smoking, asthma, or emphysema.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use dextromethorphan if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take dextromethorphan before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using dextromethorphan if you have emphysema or chronic bronchitis.

Dextromethorphan may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Dextromethorphan may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Artificially-sweetened liquid forms of cough medicine may contain phenylalanine. This would be important to know if you have phenylketonuria (PKU). Check the ingredients and warnings on the medication label if you are concerned about phenylalanine.

How should I take dextromethorphan?

Use dextromethorphan exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended. Cough medicine is usually taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Do not give dextromethorphan to a child younger than 4 years old.

Always ask a doctor before giving cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough or cold medicine in very young children.

Measure the liquid form of dextromethorphan with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Allow the dextromethorphan lozenge or disintegrating strip to dissolve in your mouth.

Drink extra fluids to help loosen the congestion and lubricate your throat while you are taking this medication. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache, cough, or skin rash.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time if you have taken a cough medicine within the past few days.

Store dextromethorphan at room temperature, away from heat, light, and moisture.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include feeling restless or nervous

For the Consumer

Applies to dextromethorphan: oral capsule, oral capsule liquid filled, oral elixir, oral liquid, oral lozenge/troche, oral solution, oral suspension, oral suspension extended release, oral syrup, oral tablet

Along with its needed effects, dextromethorphan may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur while taking dextromethorphan:

Symptoms of overdose
  • Blurred vision
  • confusion
  • difficulty in urination
  • drowsiness or dizziness
  • nausea or vomiting (severe)
  • shakiness and unsteady walk
  • slowed breathing
  • unusual excitement, nervousness, restlessness, or irritability (severe)

Some side effects of dextromethorphan may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common or rare
  • Confusion
  • constipation
  • dizziness (mild)
  • drowsiness (mild)
  • headache
  • nausea or vomiting
  • stomach pain

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to dextromethorphan: compounding powder, oral capsule, oral disintegrating strip, oral drops, oral liquid, oral lozenge, oral solution, oral suspension extended release, oral syrup, oral tablet chewable

General

Adverse effects have included gastrointestinal disturbances such as stomach upset and diarrhea.[Ref]

Nervous system

Frequency not reported: Drowsiness, dizziness, convulsions[Ref]

Respiratory

Frequency not reported: Respiratory depression[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Frequency not reported: Vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal disturbance[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Rare (less than 0.1%): Fixed-drug eruptions[Ref]

Psychiatric

Cases of abuse have been reported.[Ref]

Frequency not reported: Mental confusion, excitation, insomnia, abuse[Ref]

Dermatologic

Frequency not reported: Rash, angioedema, pruritus, urticaria[Ref]

Some side effects of dextromethorphan may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

(web3)