Trimethadione

Name: Trimethadione

Trimethadione Precautions

Trimethadione can cause serious side effects, including:

1. Rash. This may need to be treated in a hospital and may be life-threatening. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms:

  • skin rash
  • hives
  • sores in your mouth

2. Blood problems that can be life-threatening. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Fever, swollen glands, or sore throat that come and go or do not go away
  • Frequent infections or an infection that does not go away
  • Easy bruising
  • Red or purple spots on your body
  • Bleeding gums or nose bleeds
  • Severe fatigue or weakness

3. Liver problems. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms:

  • yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes (jaundice)
  • dark urine
  • nausea or vomiting
  • loss of appetite
  • pain on the right side of your stomach (abdomen)

4. Kidney problems that may be life-threatening.

5. Eye problems. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any new changes in your vision such as:

  • problems seeing in bright light
  • blurred vision

6. Birth defects in your unborn baby.

  • Women who can become pregnant should talk to their healthcare provider about using other possible treatments instead of trimethadione. If the decision is made to use trimethadione, women should use effective birth control (contraception). Talk with your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Birth defects may occur even in children born to women who are not taking any medicines and do not have other risk factors.
  • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant while taking trimethadione. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will continue to take trimethadione while you are pregnant.
  • If you become pregnant while taking trimethadione, talk to your healthcare provider about registering with the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry. You can enroll in this registry by calling 1-888-233-2334. The purpose of this registry is to collect information about the safety of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy.
  • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is unknown if trimethadione passes into breast milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby if you take trimethadione.

7. Like other antiepileptic drugs, trimethadione may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you:

  • thoughts about suicide or dying
  • attempts to commit suicide
  • new or worse depression
  • new or worse anxiety
  • feeling agitated or restless
  • panic attacks
  • trouble sleeping (insomnia)
  • new or worse irritability
  • acting aggressive, being angry, or violent
  • acting on dangerous impulses
  • an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania)
  • other unusual changes in behavior or mood

How can I watch for early symptoms of suicidal thoughts and actions?

  • Pay attention to any changes, especially sudden changes in mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings.
  • Keep all follow-up visits with your healthcare provider as scheduled.
  • Call your healthcare provider between visits as needed, especially if you are worried about symptoms.

8. Symptoms that are like the symptoms of lupus or myasthenia gravis. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms:

  • droopy eyelids
  • a rash on your cheeks or other parts of your body
  • sensitivity to the sun
  • new joint or muscle pains
  • chest pain or shortness of breath
  • swelling of your feet, ankles, and legs
  • weakness of your arms or legs
  • problems swallowing
  • speech problems
  • swollen glands (enlarged lymph nodes)

Trimethadione can cause blurred vision and drowsiness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how trimethadione affects you.

Do not stop trimethadione without first talking to a healthcare provider. Stopping trimethadione suddenly can cause serious problems. Stopping a seizure medicine suddenly in a patient who has epilepsy can cause seizures that will not stop (status epilepticus).

Suicidal thoughts or actions can be caused by things other than medicines. If you have suicidal thoughts or actions, your healthcare provider may check for other causes.

Do not take trimethadione if you are allergic to trimethadione or to any of its ingredients.

Inform MD

Before taking trimethadione, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • blood problems
  • kidney problems
  • liver problems
  • eye problems
  • depression, mood problems or suicidal thoughts or behavior
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding
  • any other medical conditions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

 

Trimethadione and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Women who become pregnant are encouraged to enroll in the NAAED Pregnancy Registry. This registry is collecting information about the safety of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy. To enroll, patients can call the toll free number 1-888-233-2334.

See the section ‚ÄúTrimethadione Precautions‚ÄĚ for more information regarding use of trimethadione during pregnancy.

What is the most important information I should know about trimethadione?

You should not stop using trimethadione suddenly. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse.

How should I take trimethadione?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The chewable tablet may be chewed or swallowed whole.

While using trimethadione, you may need frequent blood and urine tests. You must remain under the care of a doctor while taking this medicine.

Do not stop using trimethadione suddenly, even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may cause increased seizures. Follow your doctor's instructions about tapering your dose.

Store in the refrigerator, do not freeze. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

What other drugs will affect trimethadione?

Taking this medicine with other drugs that make you sleepy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before taking trimethadione with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or depression.

Other drugs may interact with trimethadione, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Precautions While Using trimethadione

It is very important that your doctor check your and your child's progress closely while using trimethadione to see if it is working properly and to allow for a change in the dose. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for any unwanted effects.

Do not stop taking trimethadione without first checking with your doctor. Stopping a seizure medicine suddenly in a patient who has epilepsy can cause seizures that will not stop (status epilepticus). Your doctor may want you or your child to slowly reduce the amount you are using before stopping completely.

Trimethadione may cause some people to be agitated, irritable, or display other abnormal behaviors. It may also cause some people to have suicidal thoughts and tendencies or to become more depressed. If you, your child, or your caregiver notice any of these side effects, tell your doctor right away.

Trimethadione may cause lupus-like and myasthenia-like symptoms. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child has droopy eyelids, rash on the cheeks or other parts of the body, sensitivity of the skin to sunlight, joint or muscle pain, chest pain, swelling of the feet, ankles, and legs, weakness of the arms or legs, trouble swallowing, speech problems, or swollen glands.

Tell your doctor right away if you or your child feels unusually weak, starts bruising easily, has bleeding gums or nosebleeds, seems to be sick more often, has a fever, swollen glands, or a sore throat that will not go away. These could be a signs of a serious problem with the number of blood cells in your body.

Serious skin reactions can occur with trimethadione. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have a severe skin rash, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, red skin lesions, sores or ulcers on the skin, or fever or chills while you or your child are using trimethadione.

Trimethadione may make you dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how trimethadione affects you.

Check with your doctor before using trimethadione with alcohol or other medicines that affect the central nervous system (CNS). The use of alcohol or other medicines that affect the CNS with trimethadione may worsen the side effects of trimethadione, such as dizziness, poor concentration, drowsiness, unusual dreams, and trouble with sleeping. Some examples of medicines that affect the CNS are antihistamines or medicine for allergies or colds, sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicines, medicine for depression, medicine for anxiety, prescription pain medicine or narcotics, medicine for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, other medicine for seizures or barbiturates, muscle relaxants, or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics.

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